Other interesting things about Tanzania

Morogoro

Morogoro is a city with a population of 315,866 (2012 census) in the southern highlands of Tanzania, 169 km (105 mi) west of Dar es Salaam, the country’s largest city and commercial centre, and 223 km (139 mi) east of Dodoma, the country’s capital city.[3] Morogoro is the capital of the Morogoro Region. It is also known informally as “Mji kasoro bahari”, which translates as “city short of an ocean/port”.

Morogoro lies at the base of the Uluguru Mountains and is a centre of agriculture in the region. The Sokoine University of Agriculture is based in the city. A number of missions are also located in the city, providing schools and hospitals.

Morogoro is the home of Salim Abdullah, who was the founder of the Cuban Marimba jazz band, and the Morogoro Jazz Band, another well-known band established in 1944.[4] From the mid-1960s to the 1970s, Morogoro was home to one of Tanzania’s most influential and celebrated musicians, Mbaraka Mwinshehe, a lead guitarist and singer-songwriter[4]. It is also home to the Amani Centre, which has helped over 3,400 disabled people in the surrounding village.

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Kiswahili

The Swahili language or Kiswahili[5] is a Bantu language and the mother tongue of the Swahili people. It is spoken by various communities inhabiting the African Great Lakes region and other parts of Southeast Africa, including Tanzania, Kenya,Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Mozambique and the Democratic Republic of Congo.[6] The closely related Comorian language, spoken in the Comoros Islands, is sometimes considered a Swahili dialect.
Although only around five million people speak Swahili as their mother tongue,[7] it is used as a lingua franca in much ofSoutheast Africa. The total number of Swahili speakers exceeds 140 million.[8] Swahili serves as a national or official languageof four nations: Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is also one of the official languages of the African Union.

Some Swahili vocabulary is derived from Arabic through contact with Arabic-speaking Muslim inhabitants of the Swahili Coast. It has also incorporated German, Portuguese, English, Hindi and French words into its vocabulary through contact with empire builders, traders and slavers during the past five centuries.

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Article Souce: Wikipedia